Free Thai Font Collection

Recent changes to the Thai Font Collection Thai Font Collection last updated on 2020-03-18 Added Cadson Demak Sarabun font family (different from TH Sarabun New under DIP SIPA). Adding 16 typefaces for the font family. Refreshed NECTEC-TLWG fonts, expanding them to match what is available in the 2020-01-04 Debian distribution. Total of 58 typefaces in ... Read more

Thai vs. English Consonants

Comparing and contrasting the similarities and differences between two languages is an effective tactic for second language learners. Direct cognitive awareness of those differences, while engaging in recognition and production of the differences, is more effective than indirect trial and error. Instruction and exercises that highlight these differences are important for mastery.

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Thai Languages

Thai languages, or languages in Thailand, are many and diverse. Scholars generally use the term Tai to refer to a larger language family which ranges across much of Mainland Southeast Asia and what is now Southern China. The main point is that there is ongoing research, different ideas, and not full agreement, on how to distinguish which languages are related to each other and which are siblings and which are parent languages.

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Understanding Thai Transcription

INCOMPLETE - WORK IN PROGRESS It is common for those learning Thai to run across transcription of spoken Thai into systems other than the Thai script. At first, one would think that there would be a single correct transcription, for example based on the International Phonetical Association (IPA) that would accurately capture all the sounds ... Read more

Fonts with Thai & Roman (Latin)

One challenge for using Thai script on a computer is that Thai characters are more vertical than roman alphabet characters. If one is mixing roman and Thai characters in a document, the Thai characters tend to be much smaller (and therefore illegible if the roman characters are optimized for space and legibility). The reason for this is that Thai characters, along with vowel markers, tone marks, and the silent marker can stack above and below a character, which means they are generally much taller than Roman (Latin) and other alphabet systems.

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